Thursday, January 3, 2013

Two book review & giveaway: "The Magic Word" and "Peter and the Whimper Whineys" by Sherrill S. Cannon

Everyone loves a well-behaved, sweet mannered child.  So when we encounter a rude, selfish, demanding, whining, whimpering child we get into "get-them-straightened-out, teach-them-the-right-way, let's-do-better-than-that" mode. Author Sherrill S. Cannon has given us two such wonderful teaching story tools to use to help our ill-behaved children learn better and to help the ones who are not so ill-behaved make certain they are not classified that way.  Let's see what she has in store for us in her award winning books....

The Magic Word by Sherrill S. Cannon

About the book: The Magic Word is a book emphasizing good manners which can be read to toddlers, but is especially appropriate for kindergarteners because they are going to school and learning about making friends and developing good social skills.  It is a rhyming story of a little girl who is rude, selfish and demanding – and has few friends because of her lack of consideration for others. Her mother suggests she “think more of others and less about you”, and recommends Elisabeth use "Please" and "Thank You" frequently.  When Elisabeth goes to school the next day, she finds that it is important to “try to treat others the way you would like” and discovers that she has made many new friends.  It emphasizes the importance of good manners and the use of the "golden rule". The Magic Word has won six awards: a 2011 Readers Favorite Gold Medal, a 2011 NABE Pinnacle Achievement Award, a 2011 Global eBook Finalist Award, a 2012 Reader Views Second Place Award, and was both a 2012 Next Generation Indie Finalist and a 2012 International Book Award Finalist.

My thoughts: If you have read any of my reviews of children's books, by now you realize that I am a big fan of rhyme for telling the story.  The meter (or rhythm/cadence) and the repetition of sounds and word endings impacts the learning positively so that what is being heard and read more likely stays with the child.  So let's look at our rude little girl in The Magic Word.
Elisabeth “never said thank you, excuse me or please.
She made fun of people, she’d argue and tease.
She took what she wanted whenever she could, 

Elisabeth’s manners were not very good.”


and later..... Cannon uses more of a poetic prose....

It was hard to please others, to try things their way.

But she knew she was happier now, for at last
She felt she was finally a part of her class.
------------
"That was my teacher, she said she'd come, too.
That's all of my class, and with me--twenty-two!"
So Elisabeth learned her lesson and became more pleasant to be around and made friends.

Peter and the Whimper-Whineys by Sherrill S. Cannon


About the book: Peter and the Whimper-Whineys is another teaching book, and is a fun way to help children stop whining. Read with alternating whining and normal voice, it helps children understand how annoying whining can be! It is about a small rabbit who whines all the time. His mother cautions him that if he keeps on whining and crying, he’ll have to go live with the Whimper-Whineys. One night Peter hops into the dark forest and meets some Whimper-Whineymen. He discovers that not only do the Whimper-Whineys whine all the time, but they are very ill-mannered and rude. He discovers that everything is sour in Whimper-Whineyland and decides his mother was right! If only he can get back home. Peter and the Whimper-Whineys has won a 2011 USA Best Books Finalist Award, and a 2011 Readers Favorite Bronze Medal.

My thoughts: Peter is another that needs to learn behavior skills and get-along-with-others manners.  He was not good to be around anyone!  Let's see how Ms. Cannon helps Peter learn not to whimper....
In a house in the forest all covered with vines
Lived a very small rabbit who did nothing by whine.
He'd whine and he'd cry from morning till night,
and nothing that anyone did would be right.
and later...... (after meeting a little man ....)
"I've heard all the whining and crying you do,"
Whined the strange little man with the great big red nose,
Who was dressed all in green in his strange little clothes.
"I'm a Whimper-Whiney, a Whimper-Whiney Man,
And I've come to take you to Whimper-Whineyland."
Of course the little man was his imagination or dream, but it seem to bring him around to living without whimpering and whining. 

I found these books enjoyable to read, very nicely illustrated by the Kalpart team, and educational for children as well as "fun."
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ GIVEAWAY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Just enter via the Rafflecopter links below.  (Please be patient as Rafflecopter is sometimes a bit slow to load.) This giveaway only open to USA addresses. Begins Jan. 3, 2013 - ENDS January 26 at 12:01 a.m. EST
a Rafflecopter giveaway

DISCLOSURE: The author, Sherrill S. Cannon provided a copy of each of these books for the purpose of my giving an honest review. Opinions expressed are solely my own and no requirement for a positive review was made.  A copy of each book will be provided by the author and mailed by the author directly to the giveaway winner.

17 comments:

  1. My worst experiences have come from my young children throwing tantrums in public. It always seems to put me in a difficult situation because onlookers tend to judge the situation without knowing the circumstances. The question is how do I discipline a child in this situation?

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    1. When a child is ugly acting, misbehaving, or down-right tantrum throwing in public, the parent should not discipline them there in public. They should ask someone to hold onto their "purchase items" (if in a situation such as a grocery store), remove the child from the premises, retreat to a safe and non-public area and discuss the situation calmly with the child. The promise of sterner discipline to follow at home can be made. Abusive discipline is never good for the child in public or at home and other means should be sought.

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    2. You should write an advice column for parents Vera! :)

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    3. I didn't raise my children perfectly; but I realize now that they are grown and with children of their own (I have 13 grand children), that their parenting and their individual lives are a reflection on what I did as a parent. So I am thankful for the things I did that were RIGHT, and I am very thankful to God for His provision in not letting those things I did WRONG affect them.

      No one is perfect and no one has perfected the art of raising a child. In my opinion, it is the Grace of God that grants insight and direction to us.

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  2. I had a great-grandchild who was a whiner, but she got her way from her mother. I've also known grown-ups who were whiners. This one friend is always complaining about not being able to do some things ( because her husband does as she wants I imagine). But, at church most of the ladies in Sunday school give in to her. I got tired of it because I've got lots of aches and pains and no-one to help me either, so have quit waiting on her. Her main whine is she can't do this or that because she has muscle spasms. We are all getting up there in age and many have lots worse problems and don't whine about. Otherwise she is fun to be around. I would love to win these books for gifts to a great-grand.

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  3. I have a lot of trouble out of my son being ill-mannered and a whiner. He's stuck in the middle of an older sibling and two younger babies. I often feel that it is usually to get attention, which he does get, but it has been difficult to handle.

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  4. im a mom of an autistic child over the years I have learned to refocus situation and create a sense of security rather than causing the child to have a breakdown in public its better to nip it in the bud before it gets to explosive.

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    1. While those of us who have never had to experience the daunting task of raising an autistic child, it is good to see that when a parent does have that responsibility they are able to handle it in as "normal" a way as possible and to always keep in mind the well-being of the child.

      The well-being of the child (all children) and not the parent's is always paramount. Giving in to a child is not to his/her well-being; but removal from the scene, refocusing the attention of the child, and dealing with discipline in a private manner and in private is paramount.

      Calichristy2, bless you in your role of "mom of an autistic child". Perhaps you would be blessed to read this blog: (I know the parents personally) http://theologyofautism.com If you like it and contact them, please share that I recommended their blog to you.

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  5. My youngest granddaughter oftens responds to her older brother & sister by whining. I repeatedly reminded her 'no whining' and got her to tell what her issue was. She is getting better but does still need reminding.

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  6. michelle gilliland mcafeeJanuary 9, 2013 at 9:45 PM

    My middle son whines, I hate it. We've tried everything and he still whines. He isn't really disrespectful but, he whines whenever we ask him to do something. Drives me crazy.

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  7. no names but when a certain someone who is 8 yrs old whines, i now tell her to "stop that right now" she knows that whining won't get what she wants and that i mean business. when she was younger i might give in a little but now i am stricter. i find that if you set boundaries children seem to know their limits sooner than if you give in. crystal allen

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  8. Hi Vera, We are big, big, big Sherrill Cannon fans! I'll share info about the giveaway with my followers. Thanks for linking into the Kid Lit Blog Hop! :)

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  9. We've been having trouble with my grandson for some time and we're not sure why he's so different from his siblings. For instance, I won over $200 worth of stuff for him and when he got through opening them at Christmas, he said "is that all?" I'm going to talk to him about it tonight.

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    1. Today's children hardly recognize the value of anything and live in a "what's in it for me" mind-set world. It is the gimmie-gimmie generation. By nature young children are quite possessive and tend to want what others have for themselves. And when they are lavished with beautiful, bountiful goodness such as toys, clothes, and food they have virtually no appreciation. I have seen the "Is that all...." expression and heard it, too. It means that the child needs to be gently lowered a peg or so on the totem pole. Everything is NOT about the child nor is everything FOR the child. The child is in need of learning to be a gracious receiver. Most children do not have the means or opportunity to be a "giver." That is sad, because giving to those less fortunate can make a person become more appreciate of what he or she has. Of course, if it is done without actually seeing the recipient or the conditions of the recipient, then the lesson may be missed. However, you and many others, need to have a sit-down moment of "let's get this straightened out" and done with gentleness and understanding.

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  10. Lol, you want a mother of three and grandmother of seven to come up with only ONE story, that's funny.
    I guess when my oldest daughter was in high school, had a job, bought a car with her own money but was still only 17 and under our insurance plus my husbands name was on the title with hers, she was told NOT to ever let anyone else drive that '71 Nova. Well she didn't listen, she would let her boyfriend, now husband of 24 years, not only drive the car, she would let him take it while she was working. We suspected/knew this so we took our good friends who happened to be our preacher and his wife to check up on her 'car' at work. She thought since it was 'her' car she could do as she pleased with it, she got a good talking to when she got home, lol, and she wasn't too happy that our friends knew too, lol. The friends are like second parents to our kids and even grandparents to our grandchildren.

    wfnren(at)aol(dot)com

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  11. Thank all of you who have commented, and offered your stories. All of my books are about having good manners and being considerate of others - all disguised as fun stories. Peter and the Whimper-Whineys is also designed to let your child hear for him/herself how annoying whining can be. Read with alternating voices, many children react very positively to the story. I wish I could give a copy to each of you, but I will be interested to find out who wins! Thanks again, Sherrill

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  12. Thank you Vera for this wonderful set :) my baby will love them :)

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