Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Double Take! A New Look at Opposites by Susan Hood & illustrated Jay Fleck [Review & Giveaway USA/CANADA]


ISBN: 978-0763672911
Hardcover $16.99 - Ages 3-7
My thoughts:  Educational and entertaining books are always winners - well, that is if they capture the attention of the child, engage their minds, and provide illustrations and text that prove accurate and enduring. There is a plethora of "counting" books and a goodly number of books that teach shapes and, yes, opposites. The author, Susan Hood, has presented a new perspective on opposites. Perspective is what it is all about in most everything in life whether you view the trees from the mountain top, or from the flat lands. How one looks at things from their own perspective.

So in Double Take! A New Look at Opposites the young reader is introduced to a new perspective on opposites. Looking at that which is opposite as it relates to you or others or one item to another.

The presentation in rhyming text about what is near and what is far and how they are opposites is taken into account with varying perspectives. A look at strong and weak, close and far and then the author states that "a careless assumption can be a mistake." Again, looking at things more than once or from a different perspective changes one's outlook.

This is quite a good book with cute illustrations that are simple, uncluttered and definitely fun. A good educationally and entertaining book - at least from my personal perspective. (By the way, I intentionally used the word perspective to get across the value of looking at things from more than one angle or point of view.)


About the book: When it comes to opposites, it’s all a matter of perspective! Lively text and fun retro art engage kids in the finer points of a favorite concept.

Do you know opposites, yes or no? On. Off. Asleep. Awake. Opposites are a piece of cake . . . right? Not so fast! Time for a quick double take. Who knows what’s BIG unless there is SMALL? Does SHORT mean a thing except next to TALL? What is ABOVE and what is BELOW? The answer depends on who wants to know! Writer Susan Hood and illustrator Jay Fleck lead us on a topsy-turvy fun-house journey into the concept of opposites and takes it to the next level — with detours into relative terms and points of view (and a dollop of yin and yang for good measure).
GIVEAWAY
Begins July 13
Ends August 3 at 12:01 a.m. EDT
Open to USA & CANADA - No P.O.Boxes.
DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy from Candlewick Press to facilitate this review which I happily and freely give. Opinions are my own, alone. Your "perspective" might, of course, be different. This is a fun book with which to learn.

15 comments:

  1. 1. "How difficult do you think it is to teach young children about opposites and how things relate?" It could be quite difficult for some children!

    2. Candlewick.com: I would like to have "Counting With Tiny Cat," and I would like to see "One Hundred Sausages" reviewed.

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  2. I it medium hard to talk to them. They are shy so they know what the "loud" kids are like and they know they are opposite.

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  3. (1) One other picture book you would like to have - One Hundred Sausages
    (2) One picture book you would like reviewed here on Chat With Vera - The Princess in Black

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  4. I think it would be pretty difficult,unless I had visible things to compare the differences with!

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  5. I think a child will pick up teaching him or her concerning opposites rather quickly.
    1. I would like to have is "The Princess in Black"
    2. I would like "One Hundred Sausages reviewed.
    Marilyn

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  6. I think it is fairly easy teaching children opposites when you use concrete real life examples - a heavy rock and a light pebble, etc.

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

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  7. I would like a review and to have the book A Lullaby for Little One for my son. He loves books with woodland animals.

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  8. Books, especially ones with textures are great to show opposites. I also like to show my son different textures while we're looking at things.

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  9. If the child will listen I think it would be easy to teach them about opposites, but then again I'm not a teacher nor a parent, lol

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  10. I'd like to have the book And Then Comes Summer :)

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  11. It depends on the opposites, some are easier while others are not.

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  12. One I'd like to have: Counting with Tiny Cat
    One I'd like to see reviewed: Jack and the Beanstalk: A Nosy Crow Fairy Tale

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  13. I don't have children myself but I know that my nephews, particularly the youngest, had a hard time understanding opposites.

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  14. some children really have a hard time understanding this concept

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  15. Birdie SkolfieldJuly 24, 2017 at 9:08 AM

    its not hard you just have to have persistence keep up with it they get it with time

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